Mastering social media: a reader

Hardly an exhaustive list but some useful sources, background and inspiration below:

 

Statistics
How many people use top social media, apps and services?

The 7 most interesting social media studies and what to learn from them

By The Numbers: 25 Amazing Facebook Stats

By The Numbers: A Few Amazing Twitter Stats

 

Demographics
A demographic portrait of Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest, Instagram and Facebook users

Who uses which social network. US-based demographics

 

Searching and monitoring social media
Searching social media? Don’t miss what’s hiding in plain sight

 

Developing a social media policy
Social media: copyright and fair dealing

 

How to use Twitter
Twitter for the Newsroom

What use is Twitter?

Channel 4 News’s Faisal Islam’s top tips for digital journalists

 

How to use Google+
Eight Google+ tools for journalists

 

How to use Facebook
Best Practices for Journalists on Facebook

INFOGRAPHIC: How Facebook’s Graph Search Will Change Digital Marketing

 

How to use Pinterest
10 Innovative Uses of Pinterest

 

How to use LinkedIn
Top tips for journalists

Top 10 tips from 10 best LinkedIn Company pages 2012

 

How to use Tumblr
So who in news knows how to use Tumblr?

 

Blogging
Ten years on, how to make the most out of Facebook

How to write a successful blog that also promotes your business

 

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How to use Tumblr

Tumblr is a blogging platform but it isn’t WordPress. If that feels like a distinction so minor that it’s not worth making, I do think the differences between the two platforms, however small, do matter.

Tumblr tends to be more visual, more instant; less of the analysis, more of the bite-sized. Of course all these rules are there to be broken but those truths about the platform most likely explain why lots of people (and by people I mean newspapers, magazines, broadcasters etc) are struggling to work out how to use it.

As a counterpoint, here are four traditional media outlets that are using it well:

  1. Financial Times
  2. The Economist
  3. The Times
  4. New Statesman

In my Press Gazette column this week I explain why they have mastered Tumblr.

What do the following websites have in common?

So here goes:

  • The New York Times
  • The Atlantic
  • Drudge Report
  • The Huffington Post
  • AOL News
  • Gawker
  • People
  • TMZ
  • Vice
  • E.Online
  • Perez Hilton
  • Buzzfeed

The answer: the Daily Mail is gunning for them all. Or rather Mail Online US believes it is “uniquely positioned” to take them on and in the process “fill a gap in the U.S. news/ent landscape”.

We know all this because Forbes.com’s Alex Kantrowitz got hold of the marketing slide that shows Mail Online floating expectantly among this exalted company.

I’ve written some more about it over on the Press Gazette.

Apple’s iPhone and the production, distribution and consumption of news

Earlier this week, I was asked the following five questions by a student researching the impact of smart devices, particularly the iPhone, on news.

1. Why did people start reading news on mobile devices? And when?

2. How has the technology since the first iPhone changed the way we consume news on devices?

3. Why do you think Murdoch’s tablet-only newspaper ‘Daily’ failed?

4. How has the newswriting changed since the first iPhone? (i.e. shorter, punchier, use of images, headlines etc.)

5. We are available, and everything is available to us, at all times. Has this changed how many times people read news each day to keep updated?

They are interesting questions and I offered him my initial thoughts which I published on my Press Gazette blog.