Some thoughts on #DigitalJournalism

Several weeks ago Nasser Sahool, agency leader at DAC Group in Toronto, invited me to take part in his podcast series on digital strategy.

The conversation that followed made me think again about the changing role of digital journalism over nearly two decades. Here are a selection of those thoughts – a few fully formed, most partially constructed…

On the skills journalists need in the digital age
“Some of the advice never really changes. Read widely, read well, read good journalism whether it’s the New Yorker or the Financial Times or it’s a brilliantly crafted tabloid newspaper. Learn to deliver lean and concise and effective copy… Then combine this old stuff with a bunch of new skills. So, for example, as as digital journalist you’d need to learn how to open a spreadsheet and understand the data that you are seeing … Then familiarise yourself with the newish tools of the trade – do you know how to put audio together? Do you know how to use video? Do you understand how to use social networks?”

On data journalism
“Data gets to the heart of a truth and if journalism is about getting to the truth data journalism is really important.”

On the new tools of the trade
“I’m not sure all journalists realise how easy [the tools] are to use. I run workshops on social media and what I spend a lot of time doing is getting people over that hump of fear, fear of the technology – ‘I can’t possibly use Twitter because I don’t understand how to use it.’ Well, it doesn’t take very long learn how to use it. And once you understand how to use it – once you understand the lingua franca, the code of Twitter, Facebook or any of these other tools – then you are into the world of communications. It’s then about how you apply the technology not the technology itself.”

On the impact of smartphones
“The medium impacts consumption habits. We see that most obviously with the growth of the internet-enabled smartphone … which has made the internet day and the internet week longer in terms of consumption … If lots of people are consuming our content at 7.30 in the evening via a smartphone what does it say about us as a publisher in terms of what we deliver, when we deliver it, how we resource our staff, how we push this stuff out on to our website but equally through social media.”

On the dangers of infinite online space
“Just because you’ve got infinite space doesn’t mean that your reader has got infinite time. In fact they’ve got less time than they ever had because they are reading more words from more sources than ever before. So some of those old world skills of being concise – writing short and sharp and to the point – absolutely apply still.”

Read more: Episode 18: The Role Of The Digital Strategist In Journalism – A Conversation With Jon Bernstein

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Mastering Social Media: a reader ~ September 2015

Twitter

Journalists on Twitter: Stop shouting, start listening | BBC College of Journalism

Twitter for newsrooms and journalists | Twitter

The Definitive Guide To Using Twitter Cards | Forbes

Facebook

Journalists with verified Facebook profiles can now use Mentions and Live tools | Journalism.co.uk

Six Facebook changes you should know about | Slack Communications

LinkedIn

5 Ways Journalists Use LinkedIn for Research and Reporting | PR Newswire

Instagram

Instagram Journalism: The New Content Trend Shaking Up the Media World | Contently

How the BBC and Guardian are innovating on Instagram | Journalism.co.uk

19 Seriously Smart Tips To Up Your Instagram Game | Buzzfeed

WhatsApp

How the BBC is using WhatsApp to boost engagement | World News Publishing Focus

General

7 social media monitoring tools you should explore | Slack Communications

How not to tweet – further thoughts on good (and bad) social media | Slack Communications