Does the short-term high from socially distributed content – greater reach – inevitably gives way to symptoms of dependency: loss of control and financial damage?

My latest piece for the Guardian Media & Tech network is on the changing nature of social channels, the growing dominance of Facebook and the impact of distributed content on creators and publishers of content.

A couple of questions run through the piece. There’s the one above (long, I know) and there’s this one from the beginning of the piece:

Do the benefits of allowing social platforms to host your journalism outweigh the disadvantages? Most publishers, however reluctantly, will say yes and adopt the “we are where we are” argument. Others put a more positive spin on things, maintaining that publishers should go where their audience is, share what advertising revenue is available and trust that they can turn passing interest into loyal (paying) readership.

Continue reading Facebook’s dominance in journalism could be bad news for us all

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iPhone Apps Emerge As Possible Paid Solution

apple-iphone-appThe Spectator and the Guardian have seen the future of charging online – and it’s the Apple iPhone.

According to reports this week both are planning iPhone apps which will make their content available to mobile users on a pay-as-you go basis.

The Spectator will be the first out the traps with a “miniaturised, page-turning, iPhone version of the real thing“. It will cost 59 pence on an issue-by-issue basis, or £2.39 a month.

paidContent.org, meanwhile, reports that the company that owns it, Guardian News & Media, has a content app of its own “in the pipeline“.

The details are sketchy but the Guardian’s digital director Emily Bell was quoted saying:

It’s still in development, but we are working on an app which I can’t give you too much more detail on at the moment, although we are likely to charge.

Micro and one-off payments have always been more likely to succeed on mobile phones where you’re just a click away from adding a few pence to your operator bill.

That ease of use doesn’t guarantee success, of course, and doesn’t get us much closer to a paid solution for the much far, non-mobile web.

Related:
Why Moleskine Is The Model For Newspaper Survival
Scarcity, Abundance And The Misapprehension Of Online Advertising
Poll Shocker: Newspaper Readers Still Not Willing To Pay Online

Putting The Guardian Into The MediaGuardian 100

So to the annual MediaGuardian 100. I guess the clue is in the name. The paper likes to slice and dice entrants in its power list – under 40s, top 10 fallers, top 10 women, you know the kind of thing.

How’s this for size?

1. Carolyn McCall, chief executive, Guardian Media Group
2. Alan Rushbridger, editor, the Guardian
3. Stephen Fry, presenter, writer, actor (and former Guardian Weekend magazine columnist)
4. David Mitchell, actor, writer, presenter (and current Observer columnist)
5. Armando Iannucci, writer, director, producer, performer (and former Observer columnist)
6. Emily Bell, director of digital content, Guardian News & Media

At least they had the good grace to put Will Lewis, editor-in-chief of the paper responsible for the biggest newspaper story of the year, at number 10, a full 25 places above Carolyn McCall.

Elsewhere, here’s one for the digerati – the Top 10 Purely Digital:

1. Sergei Brin and Larry Page, Google
2. Steve Jobs and Jonathan Ive, Apple
3. Steve Ballmer, Microsoft
4. Evan Williams, Twitter
5. Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook
6. Jason Kilar, Hulu
7. Daniel Ek, Spotify
8. Arianna Huffington, Huffington Post
9. Paul Staines, Guido Fawkes blog
10. Richard Moross, moo.com

Million Up For Apple 3G iPhone And Dell’s $3m Twitter Windfall

This is my kind of blog. Digital Stats does exactly what it says on the tin – it is a collection of “interesting and surprising statistics about digital media and devices”. 

It doesn’t try and do anything else. Just that. Which is probably why it is one of 5% of blogs that survives beyond the initial burst of enthusiasm (*see below).

Continue reading Million Up For Apple 3G iPhone And Dell’s $3m Twitter Windfall