What do the following websites have in common?

So here goes:

  • The New York Times
  • The Atlantic
  • Drudge Report
  • The Huffington Post
  • AOL News
  • Gawker
  • People
  • TMZ
  • Vice
  • E.Online
  • Perez Hilton
  • Buzzfeed

The answer: the Daily Mail is gunning for them all. Or rather Mail Online US believes it is “uniquely positioned” to take them on and in the process “fill a gap in the U.S. news/ent landscape”.

We know all this because Forbes.com’s Alex Kantrowitz got hold of the marketing slide that shows Mail Online floating expectantly among this exalted company.

I’ve written some more about it over on the Press Gazette.

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Taking The Micheal. (Did You Mean ‘Michael’?)

Loads of stats around on Michael Jackson’s death last week and the subsequent surge in web traffic.

For example, Twitter’s audience reached an all-time, high claiming 0.24% of all US internet visits on Friday (that’s one in every 417). Similar stellar stats in the UK (0.23% share).

The big website winners were Wikipedia, Google News and the site that broke the original story TMZ.com, a Hollywood-focused celebrity site that picked up 1 in every 1,100 UK Internet visits last Thursday.

But my favourite stat from Hitwise is this: the third most searched Jackson-related phrase was ‘Micheal Jackson’.

Basic spelling, it seems, is no barrier to online greef (spl?).

Related: Guido, Jacko And Miliband’s Phantom Tweet