Writing for the web and mastering social media workshops: forthcoming dates

These are the workshops I’m running in London over the next few months:

Friday 6 March 2015 | Frontline Club |
Writing for the Web with Jon Bernstein | Find out more

Friday 24 April 2015 | Frontline Club |
Mastering Social Media with Jon Bernstein | Find out more

Thursday 7 May 2015 | DigitalFWD |
Mastering Social Media for Marcoms | Find out more

Wednesday 13 May 2015 | DigitalFWD |
Writing for the web: the insider’s guide for content marketers | Find out more

Friday 5 June 2015 | Frontline Club |
Writing for the Web with Jon Bernstein | Find out more

I also run bespoke courses. Drop me an email at jon@jonbernstein.co.uk to find out more.

Posted in Social media, Training, Writing for the web

Taking Twitter lessons from the New York Times

Don’t try too hard to please Twitter — and other lessons from The New York Times’ social media desk runs the headline as once again the team behind @NYTimes offer some insights from a year’s tweeting.

Most of the advice is well received. However – as I argue in my latest piece for the Press Gazette – the notion that we shouldn’t try too hard to please Twitter is rather undermined by the example given.

The question implied by this advice is: do print headlines work better than written-for-social-media sells? Using the New York Times’s own example, the answer is yes. But that says more about the pedestrian nature of the digital effort than some overarching rule.

A good online headline or social media sell should combine the wit (either or both meanings of the word) of a newspaper headline with a dash of digital pragmatism.

Read: What New York Times teaches us about Twitter. And what it doesn’t

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Posted in Newspapers, Social media

Mastering Social Media 2015: a reading list

Some useful, thoughtful and practical articles on social media, social networks, blogging and writing for the web:

Twitter
Twitter introduces ‘while you were away’ feature | Twitter Blog
Twitter co-founder Evan Williams: ‘I don’t give a shit’ if Instagram has more users | Fortune
David Mitchell, Twitter and the art of 140 character story telling | Content Cloud
NPR Argues Retweets by Its Reporters Are Indeed Endorsements | The Atlantic

Facebook
Introducing Facebook at Work | Facebook
What Facebook’s search feature means for brands, publishers | Digiday
Facebook promises less hoax stories and spam posts in users’ news feeds | The Guardian

Instagram
7 ways news outlets can use Instagram | Journalism.co.uk
How the BBC and Guardian are innovating on Instagram | Journalism.co.uk

What’s App
Trust issues: Why messaging apps are driving traffic and interaction | The Media Briefing

Blogging and writing
What kind of blogger are you? | Guardian Media Network
How to make journalism work online: Five writing tips | Press Gazette

The impact of mobile
Bedtime stories: What Metro and BuzzFeed’s stats tell us about mobile readership | The Media Briefing

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Posted in Blogging, Journalism, Mobile, Social media

Resist the ego bath. Some thoughts on online video

In my latest piece for the the Guardian Media Network, I look at examples of good online video in action. My experience is that most video on the web is “long, self-indulgent, rambling and shambling – video for bosses (internal stakeholders, if you must); not video for viewers.”

By looking at those that (mostly) get it right – from the NME to WSJ, The Atlantic to Channel 4’s The Last Leg – it’s possible to learn some useful lessons that are applicable in most circumstances. Lessons such as these:

1. Answer the question. Explainers work.

2. Keep it short. Brevity takes times. But it’s worth it.

3. Repurpose, repackage, reuse. Better 10 well-targeted one minute videos than one 10 minute grand tour.

4. Think discoverability. Headlines matter.

5. Text and moving images, a perfect partnership. To liven things up, aid understanding or create a brand new strand.

6. Leave them wanting more. And tell them where to go.

Read: BuzzFeed to NME: a publisher’s masterclass in producing online video

 

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Posted in Digital strategy, video

Writing for the Web workshop: sample agenda

I’ve just started running a Writing for the Web training workshop. To get a sense of the topics covered see the Slide Share presentation below.

Posted in Digital strategy, Training, Writing for the web

7 lessons in mobile publishing

Following the Press Gazette’s excellent News on the Move conference last month, I’ve written a piece for the Guardian Media Network pulling out the key lessons shared on the day.

In short, what does the move to mobile mean for publishers of all stripes? These seven things at least:

1. Plan for the extended internet day – and week

2. Think format

3. Remember, the web still rules

4. Use apps to upsell

5. Don’t forget the role of social media

6. Viral hits don’t happen without mobile

7. It’s the content, stupid

I expand on each over at ‘From BBC to BuzzFeed: lessons in mobile publishing‘.

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Posted in Content marketing, Digital strategy, Journalism, Mobile, Newspapers, Publishing models, Smartphones, Social media, Tablets

Writing for the web: a (short) reading list

I’m running a series of ‘Writing for the web’ workshops at the Frontline Club in the coming months, starting on 14 November (others are slated for 6 March and 6 June 2015). As a taster, here are some recent posts I’ve written for Press Gazette, the Guardian and Content Desk on the subject:

  1. How to make journalism work online: Five writing tips (Press Gazette)
  2. What kind of blogger are you? (Guardian)
  3. How to write headlines for the web? (Content Desk)
  4. Online headlines are different, and here’s the proof (Content Desk)
  5. What George Orwell can still teach us about writing and readability (Content Desk)
  6. From BBC to Buzzfeed: lessons in mobile publishing (Guardian)
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Posted in Blogging, Content marketing, Digital strategy, Journalism, Publishing models, Training, Writing for the web
Jon Bernstein: I am a digital media consultant, writer and editor and this is my personal blog.

Previously, I was digital director / deputy editor at the New Statesman, the multimedia editor at Channel 4 News, launch editor of Channel 4 FactCheck, editor-in-chief at Directgov and editor-in-chief of silicon.com.

How to contact me>>


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